The Hazards of Genetically Modified Soy — It’s in Everything we Eat

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Altered reproduction?

In a study expected to be published in July 2010, a Russian biologist determined third generation hamsters fed genetically modified soy were unable to produce offspring.

The study was conducted by Alexey V. Surov, at the Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the National Association for Gene Security.

“Originally, everything went smoothly,” said Dr. Surov, referring to the first generation of hamsters in the study. “However, we noticed quite a serious effect when we selected new pairs from their cubs and continued to feed them as before. These pairs’ growth rate was slower and reached their sexual maturity slowly. When we got some of their cubs we formed the new pairs of the third generation. We failed to get cubs from these pairs, which were fed with GM foodstuffs. It was proved that these pairs lost their ability to give birth to their cubs.”

Another disturbing development was the discovery of hair growing in the mouth of the animals that took part in the experiment. Dr. Surov noted: “Some of these pouches contained single hairs; others, thick bundles of colorless or pigmented hairs reaching as high as the chewing surface of the teeth. Sometimes, the tooth row was surrounded with a regular brush of hair bundles on both sides. The hairs grew vertically and had sharp ends, often covered with lumps of a mucous.”

Prior to Dr. Surov’s study, Irina Ermakova, also with the Russian National Academy of Sciences, reported in 2005 that more than half the babies from mother rats fed GM soy died within three weeks.

Genetically modified organism (GMO) studies on mice and rats have linked GM products to allergic reactions, liver problems, sterility, disease, reproductive problems, infant mortality and excessive cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

We believe these findings are cause for alarm since ninety-five percent of soya in the world is transgenic. Roughly eighty-five percent of the soy gown in the US is Roundup Ready, genetically modified soy. And since soy derivatives, including oil, flour and lecithin, are found in the majority of processed foods sold in the US, whether we like it or not, day in and day out we’re eating ingredients derived from genetically modified soy.

Additionally, food manufacturers make conventional soy protein by immersing soybeans in a “hexane bath” before they are further processed into ingredients such as oil, soy protein isolate, or texturized soy protein (TVP). Hexane is a neurotoxin and a petroleum by-product of gasoline refining.

Hexane-extracted soy protein is found in the vast majority of nonorganic foods with soy ingredients marketed to health-conscious consumers and vegetarians. Soon after GM soy was introduced to the UK, soy allergies skyrocketed by 50 percent.

Dr. Surov’s research conclusions, and similar research conclusions by others are significant considering that publications on GM food toxicity are scarce. In fact, despite FDA approval of GMO’s in 1992, no peer-reviewed publications of clinical studies on the human health effects of GM food exist.

The only study on humans revealed that GMOs linger in the body; the material inside genetically modified foods transfers into bacteria living in the intestines, where the material can continue to produce proteins inside the body long after consumption.

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper

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