10 Vegetables and Herbs You Can Eat And Regrow In Your Kitchen

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Some herbs and vegetables such as garlic, onions, and lettuce, are such basic ingredients in dishes and used so frequently that before you seem to notice, they’ve vanished from your refrigerator’s crisper.

Regrow-Herbs-and-Vegetables-from-Kitchen-Scraps

One man’s garbage is the same man’s treasure!

Gabrielle Taylor with Food Hacks astutely points out that some foods are easy to regrow at home from leftover scraps, and some can even be grown right on your kitchen counter.

Here is a list put together by Gabrielle of 10 vegetables and herbs you can buy once and regrow forever:

10 Vegetables and Herbs You Can Eat And Regrow In Your Kitchen

How to Grow Garlic from Scraps

When garlic starts to sprout, the little green shoots are too bitter to cook with. Rather than throwing away sprouted cloves, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a much milder flavor than garlic cloves and are great in salads, pasta and as a garnish.

How to Grow Carrot Greens from Scraps

head of carrot soaked in water to make carrot greens

Don’t be quick to throw the head of the carrot!

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The ends of carrots you usually chop off and throw away will grow carrot greens if you put them in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit windowsill and you’ll have carrot tops to use as a garnish or in salads.

How to Grow Basil from Scraps

regrow basil leaves by soaking leaf ends in water

The resurrection of basil leaves!

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Put a few basil clippings with 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in a spot with direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, you can plant them in pots to grow a full basil plant.

Scallions

regrow scallion from scraps

Easy to regrow scallions are proof that nature is truly awesome!

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In as little as 5 days you can completely regrow a full scallion (or green onion) from the scraps. Leave about an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water. In a few days, you’ll have all new scallions.

How to Grow Romaine Lettuce from Scraps

regrow romaine lettuce from kitchen scraps

Regrow romaine lettuce from unwanted scraps

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If you have a stem from a head of romaine lettuce that’s still intact, place the stump in a bowl with about ½ inch of water and put it on a windowsill. You’ll start to see new leaves in about 2 weeks, and they’ll be full grown in 3 to 4.

How to Grow Bok Choy from Scraps

Regrow bokchoy from kitchen scraps

Look at that transformation!

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Just like romaine lettuce, bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In a week or two, you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

How to Grow Onions from Scraps

Regrow onions from onion butt scraps

We love onion butts, and we cannot lie.

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Plant the discarded root end from an onion in a pot or directly in the soil outside to regrow. You can harvest it early and get fresh green onions or wait until the bulb is fully developed.

How to Grow Ginger from Scraps

Regrow ginger from ginger scraps

Hard work pays off, even if it takes 8-10 months.

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Like onions, ginger root can be planted in soil to regrow, but the process is a lot more lengthy. It can take a few months for it to sprout, and you should be able to harvest a fully grown bulb in 8 to 10 months.

How to Grow Mushrooms from Scraps

Regrow mushrooms from kitchen scraps

Mushrooms may be a little tricky to grow, but totally worth it!

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Plant mushroom stalks in soil with some compost or used coffee grounds and keep them in a moist environment, preferably where it will be cool at night. They can be tricky to grow, and within a few days, the stems will either start to sprout new heads or rot.

How to Grow Cilantro from Scraps

Regrow cilantro from unwanted kitchen scraps

Unlimited supply of Cilantro in your kitchen!

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Like basil, cilantro can grow roots if the stems are placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, just plant them in a pot. In a few weeks, new sprigs will be starting, and in a few months, you’ll have a full plant.

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper
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