Vin De France Wines – A New Generation of French Wines

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Since 2010, Vin de France has been characterized as a table wine from France replacing the former Vin de Table category. Vin de France is a new wine classification encompassing all wines without regional geographical indication.

Vin-de-France-Bottles

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These wines state the grape variety and vintage on the label, but are not labeled by region and typically sold under brand names or as branded varietal wines.

At exclusive presentations held Oct. 22 in San Francisco and Oct. 24 in New York, a panel discussion took place to explain the new Vin de France wines to members of the trade and press as part of a U.S. new education and promotion effort.

“Vin de France wines represent a new way of producing wines in France designed with the international consumer in mind. Now U.S. wine consumers will have a broader range of original and accessible quality French wines,” said Bruno Kessler, president of Anivin De France, a French wine trade education and promotional organization.

“Vin de France wines will be available at different tiers of pricing to appeal to a wider population of wine drinkers. By establishing Vin de France, we can offer more adaptability to appeal to new generations of wine drinkers.”

Vin de France wines represent 25 percent of all exports to the U.S. According to Anivin de France sales of Vin de France varietal wines have more than quadrupled in the last three years.

Wine Business.com, points out that winemakers will now be permitted for the first time to blend the best grapes from different regions in France to ensure a consistent taste profile from vintage to vintage.

Vin-de-France

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“The wines can be either a single varietal or a blend and can show both the grape/s and the vintage on the label, along with the brand and country of origin.

With three price points — entry, mid, and premium— Vin de France winemakers are no longer confined by regulations, allowing them to produce more innovative wines.

“For the vintner, Vin de France wines offer the opportunity to use their resources in ways to create new expressions of wines,” said Valérie Pajotin, managing director for Anivin de France.

Pajotin added that this development is an important direction in winemaking in France and is important for keeping up the evolution of taste and consumer preferences in wine.

“Yet, still we will offer strong attention and trace-ability to ensure the quality standards that are the hallmark of French wines.”

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper

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